University of Minnesota
teaching with writing
center for writing
writing.umn.edu


Teaching With Writing.Center for Writing's home page.

Learning outcomes for First-Year Writing courses

These outcomes are internal guidelines to help First-Yeaer Writing teachers at the University of Minnesota think about their courses.

1201 outcomes

By the successful conclusion of WRIT 1201, students will learn to:

Recognize the contexts and requirements of typical academic writing tasks:

  • understand writing assignments and craft effective, relevant approaches in response
  • find approaches to a topic that are worthwhile to explore and relevant to the assignment

Develop a process of writing

  • practice prewriting, planning, drafting, organizing, revising, editing, and proofreading so that those steps and their recursive nature is part of the writing process
  • craft thesis statements for a paper and topic sentences for paragraphs that clearly indicate the direction of ideas
  • focus, develop, and organize claims and backing (evidence) to flesh out an argument
  • use computers in the writing process to take the full benefit of word processing software, communicate with e-mail, and access electronic resources

Practice disciplines of research and study

  • identify an author’s audience, purpose, argument, and assumptions (i.e., critical reading) in an analysis paper or class discussion
  • develop a vocabulary to discuss the rhetorical choices a writer makes at all levels
    distinguish between popular and scholarly sources; evaluate the credibility of sources
  • show an understanding of the principles of ethical and accurate documentation, and practice using a standard format for citing sources
  • consistently use complete, grammatically correct sentences, find and eliminate errors in usage and mechanics

1301 outcomes

By the successful conclusion of WRIT 1301, students will learn to:

Develop a process of writing

  • control prewriting and planning strategies to arrive at a focused topic for a paper
  • craft thesis statements that indicate a clear position on a topic and tie the paper together
  • develop a topic through clearly structured paragraphs and the whole paper so that ideas are fully explained, assertions are backed up, supporting evidence is sufficient and claims are credible
  • through the sequence of assignments, develop a body of knowledge and growing perspective on a topic
  • produce an outline or prospectus for a researched paper

Explore diverse contexts and styles of reading and writing

  • communicate their ideas and those of others to specific audiences
  • write in appropriate academic genres and computer media to communicate with different audiences
  • make choices in their own writing and articulate other options

Practice disciplines of research and study

  • identify an author’s audience, purpose, argument, and assumptions (i.e., critical reading) in an analysis paper or class discussion
  • locate and evaluate relevant scholarly and popular sources on a research topic using library resources
  • properly and ethically use MLA or APA documentation format for in-text and external bibliographic citations of scholarly, popular, and electronic sources
  • consistently follow standards of written, edited English

1401 outcomes

By the successful conclusion of WRIT 1401, students will learn to:

Develop a process of writing

  • use writing to develop new ideas
  • explore and explain the potential complexities of a topic
  • write a proposal for a paper, and know how to revise it as the paper evolves
  • craft thesis statements that focus on the results and conclusions of the paper, and are interesting to potential readers
  • use evidence from sources other than print—interview, visual and graphic, statistical and quantitative, vocal and auditory

Explore diverse contexts, resources, and choices in writing

  • show how writing on a topic fits into an academic conversation, and advances knowledge or understanding in a (disciplinary) community
  • use language resources and linguistic variation to make choices for a desired style, tone, and rhetorical effect
  • write in several genres and media for different audiences and situations

Practice disciplines of research and study

  • identify an author’s audience, purpose, argument, and assumptions (i.e., critical reading) in an analysis paper or class discussion
  • locate and critically evaluate scholarly and popular sources, and articulate the criteria used for evaluation
  • properly and ethically use MLA or APA documentation format for in-text and external bibliographic citations of scholarly, popular, and electronic sources
  • consistently follow standards of written, edited English